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Ayutthaya

Country
Thailand
State
Ayuthya
City
Ayutthaya
Type of Location
Multiple
About Location

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Places to Visit
How to Reach

By train

The cheapest and most scenic way of reaching Ayutthaya is by train. It regularly departs from Bangkok's Hualamphong Train Station and stops in Ayutthaya. The trip takes about 2 - 2.5 hrs depending on the type of service. Second class seats(A/C) cost 245 baht, third class is just 20 baht
     The railway station is not on the island but across the river a short ferry ride away. Walk across the main road and down the small street straight ahead. Ferry boats run every few minutes and cost 4 baht.


By bus

Buses operate every 20 minutes or so from Bangkok's Northern Bus Terminal (Moh Chit*) directly to Ayutthaya. First class air-con buses charge 50 baht. This trip is scheduled to be around an hour and a half, but allow at least two hours for the trip since the buses stop rather frequently and there are often jams on the roads out of/into Bangkok.


By boat

Cruise boats run up the river from Bangkok, often stopping at Ko Kret and Bang Pa-In along the way. You'll need to book in advance as there are no scheduled services, just trips for tourists. It's a fairly lengthy trip (at least one whole day) and some of the larger boats offer (pricy) overnight tours. -- Boat from Ayutthaya to Bangkok leaves 11:30AM daily

Key places to visit
Phra Chedi Suriyothai, Wat Borom Phuttharam, Baan Hollanda, Wat Phu Khao Thong, Wat Thammikarat


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Places to Visit

Phra Chedi Suriyothai
 
        A white and gold coloured Chedi built as a memorial to a previous queen. Set in a small, well-kept gardens, it is the memorial for the first heroine in Siamese history. It's of some interest as a proof of the honour that ancient Siamese society gave to women. It was renovated in 1990, and during the renovations some antique objects were found such as a white rock crystal Buddha image in the posture of subduing Mara, a chedi replica, and a golden reliquary. These ancient objects were brought to be under the care of the Chao Sam Phraya National Museum. Free

Wat Borom Phuttharam
 
         Built some time during 1688–1703 during the reign of King Phetracha on his former residence area near the main gate of the southern city wall. Its location and area plan was confined to be in the north-south direction by ancient communication routes. Unlike other temples, the King had all buildings roofed with yellow glazed tiles and the temple became known as "Wat Krabueang Khlueap" or the "glazed tile temple". The construction took 2 years and the temple underwent a major renovation in the reign of King Borommakot, who had 3 pairs of door panels decorated with fine mother-of-pearl inlays. One pair of them is currently at Ho Phra Monthian Tham inside the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, the second is at Wat Benchamabophit (The Marble Temple), and the third was turned into cabinets and is now exhibited at the Bangkok National Museum.

Baan Hollanda
 
       This museum is situated near the site of the Dutch lodge which was first built there in the 1630's. Baan Hollanda will open its doors in July 2011 and it aims at telling its audience about the Dutch settlement, how they worked, lived and interacted with Siamese society and court. The museum will provide informal learning by combining education with pleasure. The construction of the building has just been finished which means that the museum is one step closer to its opening!
 

Wat Phu Khao Thong
   
    Impressive and huge white, and slightly wonky, chedi set in a big field. You can climb to the top for extensive views over the countryside surrounding Ayutthaya, although the modern town and power lines obscure much of the historic city on the horizon. The actual nearby temple is still working and has small grounds with a smiling fat buddha image set in the ruins of a small viharn. You will see the 'Monument of King Naresuan the Great' on the way. Free


Wat Thammikarat  
 
       A working wat, but also contains the ruins of a large Chedi and a huge roofless Viharn which has tall brick columns leaning at alarming angles and a large tree growing picturesquely out of the side of one wall. It was already constructed before the establishment of Ayutthaya. The Wihan Luang once enshrined an enormous bronze head of the Buddha of the U Thong period, now exhibited at the Chao Sam Phraya National Museum. The temple also houses a Reclining Buddha hall called Wihan Phra Phutthasaiyat built by his queen consort following her wish made for her daughter's recovery from an ailment. The Wihan is located to the north of Phra Chedi with a base of 52 surrounding Singha or lions, and houses a north-facing reclining Buddha image measuring 12 metres in length, with both feet gilded and inlaid with glass mosaic. Free

Right Time to Visit

November - February

Temperature